Wordtravels

Wordtravels

 

 

 

Peru Travel Health Advice

Travellers heading to Peru will need a yellow fever certificate if they're entering from an infected area. They should also remember that Peru experiences some outbreaks of the disease. Travellers will need to receive vaccinations for certain regions, though not for Cuzco, Lima and Machu Picchu.

They won't officially need any other vaccinations, but are advised to take precautions if travelling to jungle regions. Immunisation against typhoid is sensible. Malaria is a year-round risk in the lowland areas (except Lima and the coastal regions to the south), and dengue fever is on the increase. Vaccinations for hepatitis A and hepatitis B are recommended as well, and incidents of bat-bite-transmitted rabies have been reported in the Puno and Madre de Dios provinces, and near the border with Ecuador. Visitors should have a course of rabies injections and not sleep in the open if they plan to spend time in these areas.

Diarrhoea and altitude sickness are the most common ailments for visitors. As precautionary measures, travellers should only drink bottled water, avoid drinks with ice, and be wary of street-vendor food. Healthcare is good in the major cities, particularly at private clinics rather than public hospitals. It's expensive, though, and health insurance is essential. Screening for HIV is inadequate and visitors should avoid blood transfusions.

The zika virus is a factor, though rarely at elevations above 2000 metres (6500 feet). For this reason, Cuzco and Machu Picchu should be zika-free. Travellers should still protect themselves from mosquito bites.


View information on diseases:

Cholera, Dengue Fever, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Malaria, Rabies, Typhoid fever, Yellow fever

Peru Travel Health Advice

Travellers heading to Peru will need a yellow fever certificate if they're entering from an infected area. They should also remember that Peru experiences some outbreaks of the disease. Travellers will need to receive vaccinations for certain regions, though not for Cuzco, Lima and Machu Picchu.

They won't officially need any other vaccinations, but are advised to take precautions if travelling to jungle regions. Immunisation against typhoid is sensible. Malaria is a year-round risk in the lowland areas (except Lima and the coastal regions to the south), and dengue fever is on the increase. Vaccinations for hepatitis A and hepatitis B are recommended as well, and incidents of bat-bite-transmitted rabies have been reported in the Puno and Madre de Dios provinces, and near the border with Ecuador. Visitors should have a course of rabies injections and not sleep in the open if they plan to spend time in these areas.

Diarrhoea and altitude sickness are the most common ailments for visitors. As precautionary measures, travellers should only drink bottled water, avoid drinks with ice, and be wary of street-vendor food. Healthcare is good in the major cities, particularly at private clinics rather than public hospitals. It's expensive, though, and health insurance is essential. Screening for HIV is inadequate and visitors should avoid blood transfusions.

The zika virus is a factor, though rarely at elevations above 2000 metres (6500 feet). For this reason, Cuzco and Machu Picchu should be zika-free. Travellers should still protect themselves from mosquito bites.


View information on diseases:

Cholera, Dengue Fever, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Malaria, Rabies, Typhoid fever, Yellow fever